Archaeology breakthrough as stunning Egyptian tomb poised to reveal pharaoh’s secrets

Archaeologists unearthed the ancient tomb lying next to the Step Pyramid, in Saqqara, where King Djoser was buried inside. King Djoser was the second pharaoh of the third Dynasty and is well known for building this spectacular structure for his burial in 27 BC. According to Prof Kamil Kuraszkiewicz, from the University of Warsaw’s faculty of Oriental Studies, King Djoser “was an important and revered king from the glorious past” and it was highly desirable to be buried beside him.

Excavations on the newly discovered tomb began in autumn 2021 and took place in the Dry Moat that surrounds King Djoser’s pyramid.

The moat stayed in use for hundreds of years after Djoser’s reign, but in present-day, it is almost completely covered with rubble and sand which was carried from the desert by the wind.

The newly unearthed tomb belonged to an official called Mehtjetju, who reportedly had access to top secret royal documents.

Prof Kuraszkiewicz said: “The dignitary bore the name Mehtjetju and was, among other things, an official with access to royal sealed — that is secret — documents.”

He added that Mehtjetju was “an inspector of the royal estate and a priest of the mortuary cult of King Teti”.

The tomb belonged also belonged to a royal clerk, who was known as Mehcheczi.

The Ancient Egyptian was reportedly in charge of managing the royal estates of Pharaoh Userkare and the team say they found carvings depicting his life.

In March, researchers found five ancient tombs with well-preserved paintings at a cemetery in Saqqara.

The Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities said the tombs belong to senior officials from the Old Kingdom and First Intermediate period.

They are reportedly more than four thousand years old.